Tribe Feed Forums 2024 Insight Insights into the cortical control of balance and gait in Parkinson’s disease | Dr Paulo Pelicioni

  • Insights into the cortical control of balance and gait in Parkinson’s disease | Dr Paulo Pelicioni

    Posted by BB Admin on 09/04/2024 at 5:52 pm
    Jane CLARKE replied 1 month ago 14 Members · 23 Replies
  • 23 Replies
  • Melissa McConaghy

    Administrator
    11/04/2024 at 8:19 am

    Many thanks to Paulo for the presentation and great work being done.

    For any comments or questions, please add them here so that we can forward them on to the speaker.

    • Bereket Tanju

      Member
      11/04/2024 at 11:54 pm

      Hi – I was wondering if you can comment on your thoughts on the potential benefits (for Parkinson’s) of transcrannial Photobiomodulation technique which is in the near IR spectrum.

      • Paulo Pelicioni

        Member
        30/04/2024 at 5:11 pm

        Hi there,

        This is an area out of my scope, so I might not be the most appropriate person to help you with that.

        Best,

        Paulo

  • Kerry Bacon

    Member
    11/04/2024 at 11:41 am

    Thank you for an excellent presentation. It was so relevant for those who have Parkinson’s Disease and gives hope of slowing some of the symptoms, with just a little effort.

    • Paulo Pelicioni

      Member
      11/04/2024 at 3:34 pm

      Dear Kerry,

      Thanks for your comment. Yes, it is a different trial using different exercises. We hope this will increase the uptake in the Parkinson’s community.

      Best,

      Dr Paulo Pelicioni

  • Karen Benoit

    Member
    11/04/2024 at 12:18 pm

    Thank you for the excellent presentation. Were there any auditory clues used in the gait training or visual cues alone?

    • Paulo Pelicioni

      Member
      11/04/2024 at 3:35 pm

      Dear Kerry,

      Thanks for your question. As part of our reactive balance training, we also used a metronome to help people match their cadence; thus, auditory cueing might have also played a role in our results.

      Best,

      Dr Paulo Pelicioni

  • Jenny Griffiths

    Member
    11/04/2024 at 12:22 pm

    Dr Pelicioni,

    Are the results when the participants are on or off medication?

    Regards

    Jenny Griffiths

    • Paulo Pelicioni

      Member
      11/04/2024 at 3:36 pm

      Dear Jenny,

      Thanks for your comment. Sorry for not clarifying, but participants were only assessed in the “on” stage of medication.

      Best,

      Dr Paulo Pelicioni

  • Finlay Shanks

    Member
    11/04/2024 at 12:26 pm

    did you use a broad range of near infrared spectrum or was the data input filtered to include only to response to specified wavelengths or intense speaks?

    Did you consider multi variate analysis of the broad spectral range?

  • Terence Butler

    Member
    11/04/2024 at 12:47 pm

    Thank you Dr Pelicioni for presenting your great work to improve understanding of this particular area of PD. It was one of the first symptoms I noted that alerted me that I needed to get checked for PD. My question is does regular walking contribute to any improvement in gait and or reduction of falls?

    • Paulo Pelicioni

      Member
      11/04/2024 at 3:43 pm

      Dear Terence,

      Thanks a lot for your comment. Regular walking improves one’s overall health and reduces the burden of co-morbidities (e.g., cardiovascular risks). However, my studies and the literature show that more specific walking training, such as adaptive gait, might benefit day-to-day gait.

      Best,

      Paulo

  • sam Damiris

    Member
    11/04/2024 at 5:57 pm

    Hi

    did you manage to see an increase of gait in PD patients with repeated exposure to their obstacle path and did they get more confidence and also improve their posture (Less stoop)?

    • Paulo Pelicioni

      Member
      11/04/2024 at 7:16 pm

      Dear Sam,

      Thanks for your question. We observed reduced falls in the laboratory which was partially due to the exposure to slips and trips as part of their training. These findings are promising, and we would love to do a larger-scale study to see if this reflects on real falls. We might be into something 🙂

      Best,

      Paulo

  • John Hodgson

    Member
    12/04/2024 at 12:04 am

    I an an 83 year old male and live in England and have recently been diagnosed with early PD.

    As a new member of a club that nobody wishes to join, I am open to all suggestions that will help me avoid the risk of falling.

    I attend a weekly exercise class run by Paul Goddard an excellent tutor, who has devised and adapted physical exercises specifically aimed at people like myself.

    I watched with interest the experiment that involved stepping around the pink squares and stepping on the green squares. Is there something you can suggest for me to try to replicate that at home or indeed anything else that may help?

    Kind regards,

    John Hodgson

    • Paulo Pelicioni

      Member
      22/04/2024 at 5:08 pm

      Hi John,

      I replied to you via e-mail.

      Paulo

  • Tim Dundas

    Member
    13/04/2024 at 2:45 pm

    I am a 79 yo retired GP/FP diagnosed with PD 5 years ago. Our family had the Nintendo Wii Fit game for several years before this. Several of the balance and stepping games seem intuitively likely to help improve balance and gait, and the laboratory tests described in this presentation seem somewhat similar. This reference may be of reference to those who might be considering the same question. See https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9798876/

    • Paulo Pelicioni

      Member
      22/04/2024 at 5:16 pm

      Hi Tim,

      Thanks for your question. Several pieces of evidence investigated the role of commercial video games on the health of people with Parkinson’s. It is still not well established how these video games reduce real-life falls. This is our next step (if funding allows us 🙂 ).

      Best,

      Paulo

  • Tiana Della-Putta

    Member
    17/04/2024 at 3:23 pm

    Dear Paulo, thank you for your work and interesting presentation. It was informative and very encouraging for those of us with PD who spend time doing rescue stepping practice.

    I particularly like that you have presented an hypothesis as to the cortical issues in PD and how they can be improved to help compensate for the gait issues. A couple of questions:

    1) is or will your stepping program be available to physios or people with PD ?

    2) In the meantime I am guessing that programs like the ‘Clock yourself’ app, and Blazepods, would work in a similar manner and go some way towards assisting with improving gait efficiency?

    3) My guess is that the earlier people with PD start with stepping practice the better. Falls may not be present at diagnosis, but subtle changes in stepping reactions may be. It would seem better not to wait until gait symptoms are obvious. Could you comment on this and if you agree postulate why earlier intervention would be best.

    Many thanks,

    Tiana

  • Paulo Pelicioni

    Member
    22/04/2024 at 5:20 pm

    Dear Tiana,

    Thank you very much for your kind feedback.

    Please see my answer below, according to each of your questions.

    1. We must still test it in larger cohorts and other populations before it becomes available. But we are getting there.

    2. I like the clock yourself program. However, as a scientist, I would love to study it before fully recommending it for Parkinson’s. However, it seems like a great platform 🙂

    3. The early, the better for exercise. Plenty of evidence shows that motor learning is more likely to occur in the early stages of Parkinson’s, so whatever you do, it is best if it starts early, even if these symptoms are not yet present.

    Cheers,

    Paulo

  • Tiana Della-Putta

    Member
    22/04/2024 at 8:23 pm

    Thank you Paolo, look forward to hearing more about your work and progress.

    Best wishes,

    Tiana

  • Jane CLARKE

    Member
    09/05/2024 at 8:33 am

    Dear Dr Pelicioni,

    Fantastic presentation; is the stepping mat and computer system available to purchase and use clinically?

    Jane

    • This reply was modified 1 month ago by  Jane CLARKE.

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